roadtoaesthetics:

hello-laura:

eatcleanmakechanges:

th3skinny:

shrrrr1mp:

buddybuddude:

chocolatfonce:

flawlessly-skinny:

fitgleek:

healthyismyugw:

sohifitness:

justwanttobehealthyandfit:

Oh my god…. this is making me speechless……

A good example that it’s not just about eating. There are so many other factors that contribute to weight and lifestyle. Address those factors in addition to improving nutrition and exercise and you will have more sustainable weight loss.

This makes me soo sad! :’(

Oh my god, you must watch this…

I CAN NOT wait to be a mom and teach my children everything I’ve learned about proper nutrients and being healthy and cooking them healthy yummy meals and all of that.. this is so sad.. I got shivers at the end.

This was so powerful though holy shit. All I can think about is my brother..this is the path he’s going down and there is nothing I can do:(

Shivers though. The whole time I watched it.

Exactly what my sister does to all of her kids…when she actually decides to feed them. It makes me fucking cringe. I could kill her for it.

i came very close to crying watching this

I cried. 

I wish (although I understand why it didn’t because of the final message) that this video would have addressed more of the emotional aspects that lead to unhealthy eating too. I think many many many people who have eating problems (of all kinds) have a history of trauma, and I would have liked to have seen a hint of that here — that it’s not just about teaching children proper nutrition, but also about giving them emotional support and helping them learn coping skills. 

Please everyone watch this….I can promise my kids will be healthy ^ Everyones comments are perfect and amazing.

I’ve reblogged this before and am doing so again as a reminder to myself. This will NOT be my son.

this made me think about when I’m out… and occasionally, I will see the random obese family. obese parents, with their just-as-obese children, who are no older than FIVE. and they’re all out eating large mcdonald’s meals or something similar, and afterwards they’ll have 2 ice-creams a person. and that’s their idea of a family outing.

look, I’m sorry. but I simply can’t NOT judge these parents, when I see that they’ve mirrored their own unhealthy habits into their children. it’s unfair. and cruel. they didn’t even give these kids a chance. they’re not even in school yet. it makes me so furiously depressed, I can’t even properly explain myself and how I feel about this cos my emotions are just so sjwer0935w9-r0oe[sglnf

No matter how you’ve been conditioned to eat as a kid, you have the ability to educate yourself and make different choices as an adult. Don’t place all the blame on parents, take responsibility for your own body.


It’s Not Just What You Eat, But When You Eat It: Penn Study Shows Link Between Fat Cell and Brain Clock Molecules
Fat cells store excess energy and signal these levels to the brain. In a new study this week in Nature Medicine, Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, shows that deletion of the clock gene Arntl, also known as Bmal1, in fat cells, causes mice to become obese, with a shift in the timing of when this nocturnal species normally eats. These findings shed light on the complex causes of obesity in humans.
The Penn studies are surprising in two respects. “The first is that a relatively modest shift in food consumption into what is normally the rest period for mice can favor energy storage,” says Paschos. “Our mice became obese without consuming more calories.” Indeed, the Penn researchers could also cause obesity in normal mice by replicating the altered pattern of food consumption observed in mice with a broken clock in their fat cells.
This behavioral change in the mice is somewhat akin to night-eating syndrome in humans, also associated with obesity and originally described by Penn’s Albert Stunkard in 1955.
The second surprising observation relates to the molecular clock itself. Traditionally, clocks in peripheral tissues are thought to follow the lead of the “master clock” in the SCN of the brain, a bit like members of an orchestra following a conductor. “While we have long known that peripheral clocks have some capacity for autonomy – the percussionist can bang the drum without instructions from the conductor – here we see that the orchestrated behavior of the percussionist can, itself, influence the conductor,” explains FitzGerald.

tl;dr: There’s some validity to “cut off” times - some people don’t eat after 8 p.m., or whenever. While a calorie at night is the same as a calorie during the day, eating when you’re supposed to be resting and the way your body processes calories at night may favor fat storage and actually change the rhythm of your internal clock. That, in addition to issues that often accompany night time eating and lead to overeating (disrupted sleep schedule, emotional problems, etc) contributes to weight gain. So it’s not calories themselves, but the circumstances around night time eating it that leads to it’s bad rep.

It’s Not Just What You Eat, But When You Eat It: Penn Study Shows Link Between Fat Cell and Brain Clock Molecules

Fat cells store excess energy and signal these levels to the brain. In a new study this week in Nature Medicine, Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, shows that deletion of the clock gene Arntl, also known as Bmal1, in fat cells, causes mice to become obese, with a shift in the timing of when this nocturnal species normally eats. These findings shed light on the complex causes of obesity in humans.

The Penn studies are surprising in two respects. “The first is that a relatively modest shift in food consumption into what is normally the rest period for mice can favor energy storage,” says Paschos. “Our mice became obese without consuming more calories.” Indeed, the Penn researchers could also cause obesity in normal mice by replicating the altered pattern of food consumption observed in mice with a broken clock in their fat cells.

This behavioral change in the mice is somewhat akin to night-eating syndrome in humans, also associated with obesity and originally described by Penn’s Albert Stunkard in 1955.

The second surprising observation relates to the molecular clock itself. Traditionally, clocks in peripheral tissues are thought to follow the lead of the “master clock” in the SCN of the brain, a bit like members of an orchestra following a conductor. “While we have long known that peripheral clocks have some capacity for autonomy – the percussionist can bang the drum without instructions from the conductor – here we see that the orchestrated behavior of the percussionist can, itself, influence the conductor,” explains FitzGerald.

tl;dr: There’s some validity to “cut off” times - some people don’t eat after 8 p.m., or whenever. While a calorie at night is the same as a calorie during the day, eating when you’re supposed to be resting and the way your body processes calories at night may favor fat storage and actually change the rhythm of your internal clock. That, in addition to issues that often accompany night time eating and lead to overeating (disrupted sleep schedule, emotional problems, etc) contributes to weight gain. So it’s not calories themselves, but the circumstances around night time eating it that leads to it’s bad rep.

According to a report, although only six percent of the global population lives in America, we are responsible for more than a third of its obesity. What does that mean? Who knows, because we’re 27th in math.

Colbert Report