25 Ways To Run Faster
1. Nail good form. The key to running (at any speed) is to practice proper running technique. That means keeping the upper body tall yet relaxed, striking the ground with the mid-foot landing under the hip, and swinging the arms forward and back (not side to side!) at low 90-degree angles.
2. Count your steps. Get familiar withstride turnover, or the rate of steps taken while running, regardless of pace. The fastest, most efficient runners have a cadence of around 180 steps per minute and keep their feet close to the ground with light, short n’ speedy steps. To find your magic number, run for one minute, count the number of times the right foot hits the ground, and multiply by two.
3. Get low, get high. Short on gym time? Quick! Try speed training! Intervals, or alternating periods of high and low intensity while exercising, are just one way to build speed and endurance— and burn major calories in less time, too!
4. Stride right. There’s a reason you see all those “real runners” doing short sprints before the big road race. Striders (or strides) are a series of comfortable sprints (usually eight to 12, between 50 to 200 meters each) to improve acceleration technique.
5. Run the ‘mill. Feel the need for speed?  Chase it down on the treadmill! Because the speed belt assists with leg turnover, it’s actually easier to run at a faster clip inside. Plus, the power to push the pace is right at your fingertips. A word of advice these geniuses could have used: Get on the machinebefore turning up the dial.
6. Stretch it out. The jury is still out on whether static stretches before running really prevents injuries[1]. But leaders of the pack know stretching daily (target those hip flexors!) increases flexibilityfor better strides.
7. Pick a pace. Fartleks is a funny Swedish word (yes, our inner 10-year-old boy finds it hilarious) meaning “speed play.” Alternating jogs and sprints will gradually build up speed and endurance, plus you call the shots on when to switch it up.
8. Lighten up. Even ifbarefoot running isn’t your thing, sneakers are getting lighter and lighter to mimic the foot’s natural movement and improve stride. Try a minimalist pair to see if less weight means more energy for faster feet.
9. Get to the core. Fast and fit go hand in hand. Stronger core muscles (especially the lower abs) allow runners to tap into more force and speed out on the road. The best part: Just 15 minutes of core work a few days a week is enough for a faster finish[2].
10. Breathe in, breathe out. Just do it much faster! Learning how to breathe while running at faster speed takes practice. Use both the nose and mouth while inhaling and exhaling to get the maximum amount of oxygen to the muscles. Also, try belly-breathing (not to be confused with belly dancing!), which means filling the stomach with air on each inhale, not the chest.
11. Play with toys. Who doesn’t like new toys? Try a running parachute for added resistance, or if your budget allows, see what it’s like to go for a moon-walk, err, run on an AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill.
12. Head for the hills. Run just once a week, hill repeats are shown to improve speed, build muscle strength, and add a boost of confidence, too.
13. Add weight. Stronger, leaner muscles will only help when it comes to flying past the finish line. And while runners shouldn’t necessarily take up bodybuilding, just one to two short strength training sessions a week can go a long way.
14. Lose weight. On the other hand, research shows that shedding the pounds (fat, not muscle) can help runners shave time off the clock— an average of two seconds per mile faster per pound lost! Of course, not everyone has the weight to lose (lucky them!), so remember to consult a physician before starting any weight-loss program.
15. Look ahead. Simply looking down at your sneaks or turning your head while running to check out the competition can waste precious time. Instead, focus forward— about 10 to 20 meters in the distance— and keep those eyes on the prize.
16. Toe the line. The whole body plays a role in speed— from the head, all the way to the toes! Pay attention to the piggies and try dorsiflexion (bringing the toes up to the shin) while running. Less of the foot hits the ground for a quicker stride turnover.
17. Jump on it. Take a lesson from Marky Mark in The Fighter and grab a jump rope. Boxers know that fast feet mean fast hands. But for runners, fast feet just equal fast feet.
18. Keep it steady. Slow and steady may win the race, but fast and steady builds speed! A tempo runchallenges speed-seekers to find a “comfortably hard” pace and hold it for a 20-minute period. Just don’t burn out before the run is over like that silly little hare!
19. Skip the sweets. Junk foods guarantee a sugar high, but they also slow us down. Stick to whole grains and pasta instead, which provide long-lasting energy— without the crash.
20. Hold on. Holding planks could give you abs that rival Ryan Gosling’s six-pack. But this specialrunning plank (done two to three times a week), will make you crazy stupid fast, too.
21. Go for a spin. Spinning is all about hip rotation and maintaining tough cadences— and the same goes for running! So put the pedal to the medal with some cross-training on the bike.
22. Fill ‘er up. Addicted to coffee? Turns out drinking caffeine prior to running gives an extra jolt of speed. Even more good news? It’s a totally legal performance enhancer[3].
23. Strike a pose. Get a leg up on fellow runners by adding yoga to your training plan. The increasedflexibility from runner-specific positions boosts speed and aids recovery after a long sweat session.
24. Get enough shut eye. Studies show well-rested athletes have better reaction times and clock faster finishes[4]. And think about it— the faster you run, the more time for kicking back and relaxing!
25. Strip down. When it’s finally race day, take it off! The extra layers and fuel belts, that is. The less clothing and gear on your body, the faster your time— which is why the pros practically get right down to their skivvies to run.

25 Ways To Run Faster

1. Nail good form. The key to running (at any speed) is to practice proper running technique. That means keeping the upper body tall yet relaxed, striking the ground with the mid-foot landing under the hip, and swinging the arms forward and back (not side to side!) at low 90-degree angles.

2. Count your steps. Get familiar withstride turnover, or the rate of steps taken while running, regardless of pace. The fastest, most efficient runners have a cadence of around 180 steps per minute and keep their feet close to the ground with light, short n’ speedy steps. To find your magic number, run for one minute, count the number of times the right foot hits the ground, and multiply by two.

3. Get low, get high. Short on gym time? Quick! Try speed training! Intervals, or alternating periods of high and low intensity while exercising, are just one way to build speed and endurance— and burn major calories in less time, too!

4. Stride right. There’s a reason you see all those “real runners” doing short sprints before the big road race. Striders (or strides) are a series of comfortable sprints (usually eight to 12, between 50 to 200 meters each) to improve acceleration technique.

5. Run the ‘mill. Feel the need for speed?  Chase it down on the treadmill! Because the speed belt assists with leg turnover, it’s actually easier to run at a faster clip inside. Plus, the power to push the pace is right at your fingertips. A word of advice these geniuses could have used: Get on the machinebefore turning up the dial.

6. Stretch it out. The jury is still out on whether static stretches before running really prevents injuries[1]. But leaders of the pack know stretching daily (target those hip flexors!) increases flexibilityfor better strides.

7. Pick a pace. Fartleks is a funny Swedish word (yes, our inner 10-year-old boy finds it hilarious) meaning “speed play.” Alternating jogs and sprints will gradually build up speed and endurance, plus you call the shots on when to switch it up.

8. Lighten up. Even ifbarefoot running isn’t your thing, sneakers are getting lighter and lighter to mimic the foot’s natural movement and improve stride. Try a minimalist pair to see if less weight means more energy for faster feet.

9. Get to the core. Fast and fit go hand in hand. Stronger core muscles (especially the lower abs) allow runners to tap into more force and speed out on the road. The best part: Just 15 minutes of core work a few days a week is enough for a faster finish[2].

10. Breathe in, breathe out. Just do it much faster! Learning how to breathe while running at faster speed takes practice. Use both the nose and mouth while inhaling and exhaling to get the maximum amount of oxygen to the muscles. Also, try belly-breathing (not to be confused with belly dancing!), which means filling the stomach with air on each inhale, not the chest.

11. Play with toys. Who doesn’t like new toys? Try a running parachute for added resistance, or if your budget allows, see what it’s like to go for a moon-walk, err, run on an AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill.

12. Head for the hills. Run just once a week, hill repeats are shown to improve speed, build muscle strength, and add a boost of confidence, too.

13. Add weight. Stronger, leaner muscles will only help when it comes to flying past the finish line. And while runners shouldn’t necessarily take up bodybuilding, just one to two short strength training sessions a week can go a long way.

14. Lose weight. On the other hand, research shows that shedding the pounds (fat, not muscle) can help runners shave time off the clock— an average of two seconds per mile faster per pound lost! Of course, not everyone has the weight to lose (lucky them!), so remember to consult a physician before starting any weight-loss program.

15. Look ahead. Simply looking down at your sneaks or turning your head while running to check out the competition can waste precious time. Instead, focus forward— about 10 to 20 meters in the distance— and keep those eyes on the prize.

16. Toe the line. The whole body plays a role in speed— from the head, all the way to the toes! Pay attention to the piggies and try dorsiflexion (bringing the toes up to the shin) while running. Less of the foot hits the ground for a quicker stride turnover.

17. Jump on it. Take a lesson from Marky Mark in The Fighter and grab a jump rope. Boxers know that fast feet mean fast hands. But for runners, fast feet just equal fast feet.

18. Keep it steady. Slow and steady may win the race, but fast and steady builds speed! A tempo runchallenges speed-seekers to find a “comfortably hard” pace and hold it for a 20-minute period. Just don’t burn out before the run is over like that silly little hare!

19. Skip the sweets. Junk foods guarantee a sugar high, but they also slow us down. Stick to whole grains and pasta instead, which provide long-lasting energy— without the crash.

20. Hold on. Holding planks could give you abs that rival Ryan Gosling’s six-pack. But this specialrunning plank (done two to three times a week), will make you crazy stupid fast, too.

21. Go for a spin. Spinning is all about hip rotation and maintaining tough cadences— and the same goes for running! So put the pedal to the medal with some cross-training on the bike.

22. Fill ‘er up. Addicted to coffee? Turns out drinking caffeine prior to running gives an extra jolt of speed. Even more good news? It’s a totally legal performance enhancer[3].

23. Strike a pose. Get a leg up on fellow runners by adding yoga to your training plan. The increasedflexibility from runner-specific positions boosts speed and aids recovery after a long sweat session.

24. Get enough shut eye. Studies show well-rested athletes have better reaction times and clock faster finishes[4]. And think about it— the faster you run, the more time for kicking back and relaxing!

25. Strip down. When it’s finally race day, take it off! The extra layers and fuel belts, that is. The less clothing and gear on your body, the faster your time— which is why the pros practically get right down to their skivvies to run.

23 Ways To Push Through a Tough Workout
1. Repeat after me. From the Little Engine’s “I think I can, I think I can,” to a basic “Ommmmmm,” mantras can be the necessary motivation to keep on truckin’.
2. Change pace. Circuit training, a killer combination of cardio and strength training, can help break the monotony of a long workout. Run five minutes, then drop and do some push-ups. Wash, rinse, repeat.
3. Picture this. Visualize cheering fans or crossing the finish line to bang out one more set or lap. Or just go mental: Imagine this workout is the equivalent of the Olympic trials (no big deal).
4. Work with a pro. Get on board with apersonal trainer who will play the drill sergeant or the kind, motivational type (your choice!). Still want to slack when shelling out all that cash?
5. Break it down. Set mini-goals when the going gets tough. This isn’t a three-mile run— just six measly half-mile runs.
6. Look the part. Swing those arms and keep the eyes dead ahead when running. Shuffling those feet will naturally slow the pace (duh).
7. Get rewarded. Whether it’s a slow cool down after sprints or enjoying a superfood smoothie, dangle a metaphorical carrot on a stick when the pain starts to strike (isn’t victory sweet?).
8. Gather feedback. Monitor heart rate, pace, and exercise intensity to both distract yourself and serve as a reminder of just how far you’ve come.
9. Grab a pal. Work out with a fit pal who will hold you to a higher standard. Stuck going solo today? Imagine they’re still there. After all, who wants to wuss out in front of an audience?
10. Have a purpose. Running in circles with no goal in sight? There’s nothing motivating about that. Having something to run for (think, fitting into those skinny jeans or lowering blood pressure) can be a necessary kick in the butt[1].
11. Perform. The guy across the weight room is definitely jealous. Put on a show, focusing on excellent form and making those lifts look easy as pie— you might start to believe it yourself.
12. Get distracted. Reading on the treadmill might not improve pace, but if it keeps those legs moving, it’s OK by us[2]. Choose something inspiring for a little extra push (we can’t get enough of Born to Run).
13. Savor the pain. “Pain is weakness leaving the body,” the saying goes. Pain is also proof that this workout is tough. Clearly you’re doing something right, so why stop now? (Just know when pain issignaling something more serious.)
14. Hone in. When strength training, focus on the specific muscle targeted by each exercise. This can help maintain proper form, and remember, each lift will bring you one rep closer to that goal.
15. Put it in the bank. Think of time in the gym as deposits into the fitness bank. After saving up, cash out on a special treat (like new kicks or workout gear).
16. Build a resume. Is the promise of a better butt not enough? How about knowing those plyometrics will help kill it on the court? Instead of thinking of this as a workout, consider it a training session— gathering the skills to become a better athlete, parent, lover, you name it.
17. Who’s really getting cheated? Sure, no one else would know about skipping out on the last Chatarunga. But only one person loses in that situation (hint: it’s not the super-ripped chick sweating it out on the next mat).
18. Get real. If the gym just doesn’t cut it, make like Jack and hit the road. Head out for an outdoor run and actually go somewhere, or work on functional fitness in real-life situations.
19. Say “ahhh.” Imagining the post-workout pain is hardly motivational. Instead, get into a sore-muscle-relief routine. Knowing those thighs have foam rolling in their future could keep ‘em pedaling just a little further.
20. Tune in. Use music to zone out during the tough spots. Fast, heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring cardio to the next level[3].
21. Count it out. When counting reps up from one, it’s more natural to push out one or two extra. On the other hand, some people push harder when it feels like a real countdown— try both to see what works best.
22. Compete. Whether comparing against the dude on the next treadmill over or your own time last training session, competition ups the ante and helps us forget about wanting to quit.
23. Remember the end. That post-workout high? Yeah, almost there. The struggle of that final set won’t last— and when the workout’s over, it’ll be replaced by a much better feeling: pride.

23 Ways To Push Through a Tough Workout

1. Repeat after me. From the Little Engine’s “I think I can, I think I can,” to a basic “Ommmmmm,” mantras can be the necessary motivation to keep on truckin’.

2. Change paceCircuit training, a killer combination of cardio and strength training, can help break the monotony of a long workout. Run five minutes, then drop and do some push-ups. Wash, rinse, repeat.

3. Picture this. Visualize cheering fans or crossing the finish line to bang out one more set or lap. Or just go mental: Imagine this workout is the equivalent of the Olympic trials (no big deal).

4. Work with a pro. Get on board with apersonal trainer who will play the drill sergeant or the kind, motivational type (your choice!). Still want to slack when shelling out all that cash?

5. Break it down. Set mini-goals when the going gets tough. This isn’t a three-mile run— just six measly half-mile runs.

6. Look the part. Swing those arms and keep the eyes dead ahead when running. Shuffling those feet will naturally slow the pace (duh).

7. Get rewarded. Whether it’s a slow cool down after sprints or enjoying a superfood smoothie, dangle a metaphorical carrot on a stick when the pain starts to strike (isn’t victory sweet?).

8. Gather feedback. Monitor heart rate, pace, and exercise intensity to both distract yourself and serve as a reminder of just how far you’ve come.

9. Grab a pal. Work out with a fit pal who will hold you to a higher standard. Stuck going solo today? Imagine they’re still there. After all, who wants to wuss out in front of an audience?

10. Have a purpose. Running in circles with no goal in sight? There’s nothing motivating about that. Having something to run for (think, fitting into those skinny jeans or lowering blood pressure) can be a necessary kick in the butt[1].

11. Perform. The guy across the weight room is definitely jealous. Put on a show, focusing on excellent form and making those lifts look easy as pie— you might start to believe it yourself.

12. Get distracted. Reading on the treadmill might not improve pace, but if it keeps those legs moving, it’s OK by us[2]. Choose something inspiring for a little extra push (we can’t get enough of Born to Run).

13. Savor the pain. “Pain is weakness leaving the body,” the saying goes. Pain is also proof that this workout is tough. Clearly you’re doing something right, so why stop now? (Just know when pain issignaling something more serious.)

14. Hone in. When strength training, focus on the specific muscle targeted by each exercise. This can help maintain proper form, and remember, each lift will bring you one rep closer to that goal.

15. Put it in the bank. Think of time in the gym as deposits into the fitness bank. After saving up, cash out on a special treat (like new kicks or workout gear).

16. Build a resume. Is the promise of a better butt not enough? How about knowing those plyometrics will help kill it on the court? Instead of thinking of this as a workout, consider it a training session— gathering the skills to become a better athlete, parent, lover, you name it.

17. Who’s really getting cheated? Sure, no one else would know about skipping out on the last Chatarunga. But only one person loses in that situation (hint: it’s not the super-ripped chick sweating it out on the next mat).

18. Get real. If the gym just doesn’t cut it, make like Jack and hit the road. Head out for an outdoor run and actually go somewhere, or work on functional fitness in real-life situations.

19. Say “ahhh.” Imagining the post-workout pain is hardly motivational. Instead, get into a sore-muscle-relief routine. Knowing those thighs have foam rolling in their future could keep ‘em pedaling just a little further.

20. Tune in. Use music to zone out during the tough spots. Fast, heart-pumping tunes have been shown to bring cardio to the next level[3].

21. Count it out. When counting reps up from one, it’s more natural to push out one or two extra. On the other hand, some people push harder when it feels like a real countdown— try both to see what works best.

22. Compete. Whether comparing against the dude on the next treadmill over or your own time last training session, competition ups the ante and helps us forget about wanting to quit.

23. Remember the end. That post-workout high? Yeah, almost there. The struggle of that final set won’t last— and when the workout’s over, it’ll be replaced by a much better feeling: pride.


losing-every-extra-pound:

How to Stay Motivated
“you cannot ‘find’ motivation, you must create it!”
50 Ways to Stay Motivated for Weight LossHow to Stay Motivated to Exercise12 Ways to Get MotivatedStaying Motivated to Lose WeightMore Articles about Motivation
Take it One Day at a TimeDon’t worry about tomorrow, focus on today. Focus on eating right for today, make it your goal for the day, and repeat it tomorrow, and the day after that and the day after that. 
Surround Yourself with Positivity“Change your thoughts, and you change your world”, it’s really true. Think you can, and you can do anything. Think positive, breathe positive, live positive, be positive as much as possible. Focus on the solution, rather than the problem. Surround yourself with good people, good food (food that’s good for you), and good thoughts.Create a Dream BoardBring your dreams to life. Look at them every day. Never lose sight of what you want. Fill it with your favourite quotes and pictures to inspire you. 
How to Make a Dream BoardDigital Dream BoardCreate a Dream Board
Visualize Accomplishing your GoalsIf your goal is to lose weight, create a mental picture of yourself having already achieved it. What will you look like, feel like, and move like when you have accomplished that goal? Living as if you are already there makes realizing your vision something you focus on daily. 
Make Realistic GoalsAsk yourself what you want. What do you want from life? Who do you want to be? Where do you want to be? And make realistic goals. Now that doesn’t mean you can’t have your dream body, it just means realizing that it won’t happened overnight. Make S.M.A.R.T goals. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, & Time-bound goals. 
SMART CriteriaExample of SMART goal
Reward Yourself, Be Kind to Yourself & Recognize your ProgressWhen you know you have been good to your body, treat yourself! Find a reward that inspires you- a new pair of sneakers or workout outfit, a new music CD for your walk or pamper your feet with a pedicure for all of your efforts. Give yourself a hug once in awhile! Train hard, eat right, sleep well, but once a week, allow yourself an indulgence. Enjoy your favorite dessert, get a massage, or simply take some time for yourself to relax.It’s Okay to Cheat!Once in a while, cheating will keep you on track! Planning a cheat, whether it’s a snack, a meal, a weekend or a week vacation, can make all the difference in the world. Allowing yourself a little “controlled” wiggle room, you can avoid falling off the wagon. And once your “cheat” is done, go right back to your plan.Forget about the Scale Focus on how you’re life is changing, on how you feel. Focus on how you’ve changed. Focus on the inches lost, the muscle gained. Focus on how much better you’re becoming and how much you’re gaining. Alternatively, weigh yourself once a week, or even once a month. Measure your entire body monthly as well. Take one picture of yourself daily in the same outfit for the duration of your journey. 
Don’t Compare Yourself to OthersFocus on yourself, on creating the best you possible. Remember that everyone is different, everyone has their own experiences, and their own unique imperfections. Different people are at different stages at different times. Comparing yourself to others can lead to bitterness, anger, jealousy, envy and even unhealthy competition.How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Other PeopleLearning to Live: Don’t Compare Yourself to Others


“you cannot ‘find’ motivation, you must create it!”

losing-every-extra-pound:

How to Stay Motivated

“you cannot ‘find’ motivation, you must create it!”

50 Ways to Stay Motivated for Weight LossHow to Stay Motivated to Exercise
12 Ways to Get Motivated
Staying Motivated to Lose Weight
More Articles about Motivation

Take it One Day at a Time
Don’t worry about tomorrow, focus on today. Focus on eating right for today, make it your goal for the day, and repeat it tomorrow, and the day after that and the day after that. 

Surround Yourself with Positivity
“Change your thoughts, and you change your world”, it’s really true. Think you can, and you can do anything. Think positive, breathe positive, live positive, be positive as much as possible. Focus on the solution, rather than the problem. Surround yourself with good people, good food (food that’s good for you), and good thoughts.

Create a Dream Board
Bring your dreams to life. Look at them every day. Never lose sight of what you want. Fill it with your favourite quotes and pictures to inspire you. 

How to Make a Dream Board
Digital Dream Board
Create a Dream Board

Visualize Accomplishing your Goals
If your goal is to lose weight, create a mental picture of yourself having already achieved it. What will you look like, feel like, and move like when you have accomplished that goal? Living as if you are already there makes realizing your vision something you focus on daily. 

Make Realistic Goals
Ask yourself what you want. What do you want from life? Who do you want to be? Where do you want to be? And make realistic goals. Now that doesn’t mean you can’t have your dream body, it just means realizing that it won’t happened overnight. Make S.M.A.R.T goals. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, & Time-bound goals. 

SMART Criteria
Example of SMART goal

Reward Yourself, Be Kind to Yourself & Recognize your Progress
When you know you have been good to your body, treat yourself! Find a reward that inspires you- a new pair of sneakers or workout outfit, a new music CD for your walk or pamper your feet with a pedicure for all of your efforts. Give yourself a hug once in awhile! Train hard, eat right, sleep well, but once a week, allow yourself an indulgence. Enjoy your favorite dessert, get a massage, or simply take some time for yourself to relax.

It’s Okay to Cheat!
Once in a while, cheating will keep you on track! Planning a cheat, whether it’s a snack, a meal, a weekend or a week vacation, can make all the difference in the world. Allowing yourself a little “controlled” wiggle room, you can avoid falling off the wagon. And once your “cheat” is done, go right back to your plan.

Forget about the Scale 
Focus on how you’re life is changing, on how you feel. Focus on how you’ve changed. Focus on the inches lost, the muscle gained. Focus on how much better you’re becoming and how much you’re gaining. Alternatively, weigh yourself once a week, or even once a month. Measure your entire body monthly as well. Take one picture of yourself daily in the same outfit for the duration of your journey. 

Don’t Compare Yourself to Others
Focus on yourself, on creating the best you possible. Remember that everyone is different, everyone has their own experiences, and their own unique imperfections. Different people are at different stages at different times. Comparing yourself to others can lead to bitterness, anger, jealousy, envy and even unhealthy competition.

How to Stop Comparing Yourself to Other People
Learning to Live: Don’t Compare Yourself to Others

“you cannot ‘find’ motivation, you must create it!”