Showing posts tagged body


It’s Not Just What You Eat, But When You Eat It: Penn Study Shows Link Between Fat Cell and Brain Clock Molecules
Fat cells store excess energy and signal these levels to the brain. In a new study this week in Nature Medicine, Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, shows that deletion of the clock gene Arntl, also known as Bmal1, in fat cells, causes mice to become obese, with a shift in the timing of when this nocturnal species normally eats. These findings shed light on the complex causes of obesity in humans.
The Penn studies are surprising in two respects. “The first is that a relatively modest shift in food consumption into what is normally the rest period for mice can favor energy storage,” says Paschos. “Our mice became obese without consuming more calories.” Indeed, the Penn researchers could also cause obesity in normal mice by replicating the altered pattern of food consumption observed in mice with a broken clock in their fat cells.
This behavioral change in the mice is somewhat akin to night-eating syndrome in humans, also associated with obesity and originally described by Penn’s Albert Stunkard in 1955.
The second surprising observation relates to the molecular clock itself. Traditionally, clocks in peripheral tissues are thought to follow the lead of the “master clock” in the SCN of the brain, a bit like members of an orchestra following a conductor. “While we have long known that peripheral clocks have some capacity for autonomy – the percussionist can bang the drum without instructions from the conductor – here we see that the orchestrated behavior of the percussionist can, itself, influence the conductor,” explains FitzGerald.

tl;dr: There’s some validity to “cut off” times - some people don’t eat after 8 p.m., or whenever. While a calorie at night is the same as a calorie during the day, eating when you’re supposed to be resting and the way your body processes calories at night may favor fat storage and actually change the rhythm of your internal clock. That, in addition to issues that often accompany night time eating and lead to overeating (disrupted sleep schedule, emotional problems, etc) contributes to weight gain. So it’s not calories themselves, but the circumstances around night time eating it that leads to it’s bad rep.

It’s Not Just What You Eat, But When You Eat It: Penn Study Shows Link Between Fat Cell and Brain Clock Molecules

Fat cells store excess energy and signal these levels to the brain. In a new study this week in Nature Medicine, Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, shows that deletion of the clock gene Arntl, also known as Bmal1, in fat cells, causes mice to become obese, with a shift in the timing of when this nocturnal species normally eats. These findings shed light on the complex causes of obesity in humans.

The Penn studies are surprising in two respects. “The first is that a relatively modest shift in food consumption into what is normally the rest period for mice can favor energy storage,” says Paschos. “Our mice became obese without consuming more calories.” Indeed, the Penn researchers could also cause obesity in normal mice by replicating the altered pattern of food consumption observed in mice with a broken clock in their fat cells.

This behavioral change in the mice is somewhat akin to night-eating syndrome in humans, also associated with obesity and originally described by Penn’s Albert Stunkard in 1955.

The second surprising observation relates to the molecular clock itself. Traditionally, clocks in peripheral tissues are thought to follow the lead of the “master clock” in the SCN of the brain, a bit like members of an orchestra following a conductor. “While we have long known that peripheral clocks have some capacity for autonomy – the percussionist can bang the drum without instructions from the conductor – here we see that the orchestrated behavior of the percussionist can, itself, influence the conductor,” explains FitzGerald.

tl;dr: There’s some validity to “cut off” times - some people don’t eat after 8 p.m., or whenever. While a calorie at night is the same as a calorie during the day, eating when you’re supposed to be resting and the way your body processes calories at night may favor fat storage and actually change the rhythm of your internal clock. That, in addition to issues that often accompany night time eating and lead to overeating (disrupted sleep schedule, emotional problems, etc) contributes to weight gain. So it’s not calories themselves, but the circumstances around night time eating it that leads to it’s bad rep.

Throwback - on the left, at my highest weight, and on the right at my lowest. 

Throwback - on the left, at my highest weight, and on the right at my lowest. 

health—freak:

fearsomesymmetry:

rubyvroom:

justwearthatdresswhenyoudine:

softcastle-mccormick:

nessfraserloves:

sparkamovement:

H&M puts real model heads on fake bodies. via Jezebel:

The bodies of most of the models H&M features on its website are computer-generated and “completely virtual,” the company has admitted. H&M designs a body that can better display clothes made for humans than humans can, then digitally pastes on the heads of real women in post-production. For now — in the future, even models’ faces won’t be considered perfect enough for online fast fashion, and we’ll buy all of our clothing from cyborgs. (This news sort of explains this.) But man, isn’t looking at the four identical bodies with different heads so uncanny? Duly noted that H&M made one of the fake bodies black. You can’t say that the fictional, Photoshopped, mismatched-head future of catalog modeling isn’t racially diverse. 



What do you mean people have body issues? WHY WOULD THAT EVER HAPPEN?

I never reblog shit like this, but seriously, this is bizarre-o and should stop this instant.

This is pretty ridiculous.

Even the bodies of professional models are too imperfect to properly advertise clothing with. Even with photoshop. The only solution was to invent an entirely virtual body that no human being actually has.
Let that sink in for a minute.

Wow.  I am really, really disappointed.

D: every girl should know the truth. 


I get why people are upset about this, but let’s be real. H&M is definitely not the first company ever to do this and they won’t be the last. They are a business and their only objective is to sell their product - supermodels, photoshop, mannequins, whatever it takes to get the most uniform and aesthetically pleasing advertisement possible. Yes, it’s creepy and sets unrealistic standards. But so are Barbie dolls, retouched models in magazines, and 90% of all media. Businesses and advertisers want us to be brainwashed - I think as long as we’re aware we’re being fed lies, we can resist acting the way they want us to.

health—freak:

fearsomesymmetry:

rubyvroom:

justwearthatdresswhenyoudine:

softcastle-mccormick:

nessfraserloves:

sparkamovement:

H&M puts real model heads on fake bodies. via Jezebel:

The bodies of most of the models H&M features on its website are computer-generated and “completely virtual,” the company has admitted. H&M designs a body that can better display clothes made for humans than humans can, then digitally pastes on the heads of real women in post-production. For now — in the future, even models’ faces won’t be considered perfect enough for online fast fashion, and we’ll buy all of our clothing from cyborgs. (This news sort of explains this.) But man, isn’t looking at the four identical bodies with different heads so uncanny? Duly noted that H&M made one of the fake bodies black. You can’t say that the fictional, Photoshopped, mismatched-head future of catalog modeling isn’t racially diverse. 


What do you mean people have body issues? WHY WOULD THAT EVER HAPPEN?

I never reblog shit like this, but seriously, this is bizarre-o and should stop this instant.

This is pretty ridiculous.

Even the bodies of professional models are too imperfect to properly advertise clothing with. Even with photoshop. The only solution was to invent an entirely virtual body that no human being actually has.

Let that sink in for a minute.

Wow. I am really, really disappointed.

D: every girl should know the truth. 

I get why people are upset about this, but let’s be real. H&M is definitely not the first company ever to do this and they won’t be the last. They are a business and their only objective is to sell their product - supermodels, photoshop, mannequins, whatever it takes to get the most uniform and aesthetically pleasing advertisement possible. Yes, it’s creepy and sets unrealistic standards. But so are Barbie dolls, retouched models in magazines, and 90% of all media. Businesses and advertisers want us to be brainwashed - I think as long as we’re aware we’re being fed lies, we can resist acting the way they want us to.